b2cloud wins Mobile Design Awards 2014

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We are thrilled to announce that b2cloud has won the Mobile Design Award for Best Wearable Technology for our work with Telstra. The award recognises our innovative work using Google Glass to help empower the visually

Telstra and b2cloud – using Google Glass to improve people’s lives.

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We are thrilled to announce some groundbreaking work we have been doing with Telstra for Google Glass. Over the past six months we have developed two world-first Google Glass apps designed for the visually and

#14 in Deloitte Tech Fast 500 Asia-Pacific 2013

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What a proud day for the b2cloud team. We have just been announced by the Deloitte Tech Fast 500 Asia Pacific as the 14th fastest growing technology company in the region, and the fastest growing mobile app developer.

Writing an Objective-C wrapper for C++

Guides | Tutorial By 2 months ago

Recently at work I completed a C++ library that we’re using in both our iOS and Android apps. To make it easy for our native iOS app to use, I also wrote an Objective-C wrapper

Convenient Swift Features (vs. Obj-C)

Guides | Tutorial By 4 months ago

Swift has made huge leaps over Objective-C when it comes to certain code-level features. This reduces the amount of code needed to be written to achieve the same, and also makes Swift code much more

Transitioning from Objective-C to Swift

Thoughts | Tutorial By 4 months ago

When Apple mentioned Swift dropped the C baggage from Objective-C they meant it. Unfortunately there were many C tricks I used in Objective-C projects that now need a workaround. I’ve been looking at different ways

MD5 for iOS and Mac, the proper way

Thoughts | Tutorial By 9 months ago

There’s a lot of MD5 iOS solutions floating around out there. From the ones I’ve seen, they all have a common problem. They all assume you want to MD5 an NSData instance, meaning all of the data must be in memory in order to digest it.

Now this will work in most cases, but say you want to MD5 a 1 gigabyte file… on an iPhone. You’re probably going to have a few problems.

Obj-C performance week 3: UIImage speed

Thoughts By 10 months ago

I’ve always been interested in app file size and the overall app’s performance. When dealing with images, these sometimes go hand in hand…

Sharing source in Xcode (Lite/Paid, reskinning…)

Guides | Tutorial By 11 months ago

Whenever you have a couple of apps that are extremely similar, it will make sense to share the code between the two. For example, a Lite version and a Paid version of the same app, or the same app skinned differently for different clients. At first you might be tempted in duplicating the project. Don’t. If the code splits then it’s going to be a nightmare copying changes between two places, or even just having them in two separate projects.

#warning notes

Guides | Tutorial By 1 year ago

When coding, personal notes are a good way to make sure you don’t forget anything, and keep track of certain things. I often see people making notes either physically or in a document, however there is a better solution…

Automatic Reference Counting

Guides | Tutorial By 1 year ago

Automatic Reference Counting (ARC) has been around since iOS 5, however it has been an optional tick box when beginning a new project, and if not selected, Manual Reference Counting (MRC) is used. As of Xcode 5, the ARC tick box is missing, and all new projects start with ARC. While you can still disable ARC manually in the project's config file, this is probably a good sign that ARC is the way to go for new projects.

Separating Xcode builds (debug vs release)

Guides | Tutorial By 1 year ago

When you send a build to your client or testers, it can be difficult telling development builds from AppStore builds. At b2cloud we split the builds with two different app ids, and a different app title to make it easy to tell them apart. Because the app id is different it means you can have both builds on your device at the same time, and the development one wont overwrite the AppStore one, and vice versa.

Running a Unit Test after each build in Xcode

Guides | Tutorial By 1 year ago

Unit Tests are a good way to ensure things don’t break while coding. In Xcode by default they are run manually. Because it’s manual you may forget to run them, or a new person to the project may not know about them. You can set Xcode up to run them automatically every time you build your app, which ensures nothing will go unnoticed.

Here’s how to do that.